Bauhistorisches Fenster 12

Historic Window 12

This room formed the gateway to the keep which was erected in 1265 (d). Here large areas of mediaeval plaster and a fireplace alcove have been preserved.

In the West wall there is chimney opening next to the entrance which is almost 1 metre deep and 1.5 metres wide. It was part of the original tower. For a long time this fireplace was not used, as there are only minimal traces of soot on the mediaeval interior surfaces. The fireplace was altered when the tower, presumably damaged after the military repression of the town led by the Archbishop in September 1327, was restored and raised by an extra storey, for defensive purposes, in 1329 (d). The exposed areas of baroque plaster and the careless painting above of white baroque lime wash show that the alcove was used. What it was used for remains unknown. It wasn’t added until the 19th century and the floor level of the room was raised by around 80 centimetres, so that today the room can be entered at several levels.

The wall plaster is characterised by a greyish brown coarse surface. It remained without render or paint until changes were carried out to the keep in the 17th century. At this time a new ceiling was added, and the large new window on the south side allowed more light into the room. A new layer of plaster was added, and on top a white spatial composition, typical of the time, with grey architectural accentuation, which reflects the light far into the room.